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Dutch Royals Can Now Have Same-Sex Marriages Without Giving up Their Right to the Throne

Dutch Royals Can Now Have Same-Sex Marriages Without Giving up Their Right to the Throne

The topic of same-sex marriages among the royals came to light after recently published books pointed out that the country's rules exclude the possibility of a same-sex royal couple.

Back in 2000, Netherlands legalized same-sex marriages, thus becoming the first country in the world to do so. However, these rules did not apply to members of the Dutch Royal Family— if they were to get married to someone of the same sex, then they would have to forfeit their right to the throne. This was the government's rule, states Washington Post

Unlike regular marriages, Royals need permission from the government to get married, and on more than one occasion, members have given up their place in the line of succession to marry someone without permission.

Now, Prime Minister Mark Rutte announced on October 12, 2021, that the Dutch princess, 17-year-old Catharina-Amalia Beatrix Carmen Victoria, is free to marry anyone of any gender without having to give up her crown. Meanwhile, the crown princess is yet to comment on the matter, and not much is known of her personal life, anyway.



 

 

The topic of same-sex marriages among the royals came to light after recently published books pointed out that the country's rules exclude the possibility of a same-sex royal couple, reports NBC News.

This new rule comes in place—certainly as a whiff of fresh air— as Rutte noted that times have changed since one of his predecessors last addressed the issue in 2000. "The government believes that the heir can also marry a person of the same sex," Rutte wrote in a letter to parliament. "The cabinet, therefore, does not see that an heir to the throne or the King should abdicate if he/she would like to marry a partner of the same sex."

However, the logistics of succession are still “frightfully complicated,” Rutte said, adding that they'd cross that bridge when they get to it. "It's just very dependent on the facts and circumstances of the specific case, as you can see by looking back at how family law can change over time," he wrote.



 

 

This topic is one that has been avoided by royal families all over the world, for fear of being shunned by the family as well as the public. A third cousin of Queen Elizabeth II became the first openly gay member of the British royal family when he came out in 2016. Lord Ivar Mountbatten, 58, later married his partner in the monarchy’s first same-sex wedding.

Unfortunately, the same could not be said for Indian Prince, Prince Manvendra Singh Gohil, who came out in 2006. His mother tried to disown him, some people burned effigies in his hometown, Rajpipla, and he received death threats, the New York Times reported.

Hopefully, other royal families will soon follow the Dutch and let members of their family be with whoever they wish to be, gender no bar. 



 

 

References:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2021/10/12/dutch-royal-family-same-sex-marriage/

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/dutch-royals-can-marry-same-sex-partner-without-giving-crown-n1281394

https://www.insider.com/photos-from-british-royal-family-first-same-sex-wedding-lord-ivar-mountbatten-2018-10

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/31/world/asia/india-prince-manvendra-gay-rights.html

Cover Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Patrick van Katwijk

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