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First Relationships Witnessed as a Child Can Affect Different Aspects of Life as an Adult, Study Says
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First Relationships Witnessed as a Child Can Affect Different Aspects of Life as an Adult, Study Says

For those who have been through heartwrenching trauma, the road can be far from easy, but recognizing how your early experiences have affected you can be a huge step forward.

Representational Cover Image Source: Getty Images | Guido Mieth
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There's no doubt that what you witness when you're younger affects you in some way or another later in life. Sometimes it can be positive but other times it can be quite difficult to navigate through. When we're growing up we model the idea of relationships based on the first ones we see. This could be with our parents or other family members. From imagination and expectations, hopes and aspirations, how we deal with feelings, and how we respond in relationships could stem from our early environment. A study published in Child Development discovered that the kind of emotional support a child receives during the first three and a half years has an effect on different aspects of their life including education, social life, and romantic relationships... and this effect can happen even 20 or 30 years later.

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Image Source: Getty Images | Morsa Images
Image Source: Getty Images | Morsa Images

 

Childhood experiences may also affect the way you communicate with others as an adult. "It seems like, at least in these early years, the parents' role is to communicate with the child and let them know, 'I'm here for you when you're upset, when you need me. And when you don't need me, I'm your cheerleader,' " shared Lee Raby, a psychologist and postdoctoral researcher at the University of Delaware who led the study, according to NPR. Jay Belsky, a professor of human development at the University of California who was not involved in the study, believes that human development is a lot more complicated. "We know that our early experiences likely affect all of us to a certain extent," Belsky explained. "For some, therapy or medication may help. And it's interesting, because there's now other evidence suggesting that the very kids who succumb under bad conditions are the ones who really flourish under good ones."