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21-YO Woman Was Diagnosed With Cancer After Mistaking a Line on Her Thumb to Be a Bruise | It Was Melanoma
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21-YO Woman Was Diagnosed With Cancer After Mistaking a Line on Her Thumb to Be a Bruise | It Was Melanoma

Even though she had a history of melanoma in her family, she never expected what seemed like a minor bruise on her finger to be anything serious.

Source: Instagram, Facebook | Karolina Jasko
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Editor's note: This article was originally published on February 15, 2021. It has since been updated.

A former Miss Illinois, Karolina Jasko, had gone to the salon when she was a high school senior to get her nails done, as she usually did a couple of times a month, when the technician alerted her about an infection on her thumb and a black line on her right thumbnail. She used to get acrylic nails on top of her real ones which were cured with ultraviolet (UV) light. She had a history of melanoma in her family and was really careful about it. So, when it showed up on her thumb in December 2016, her mother and she were taken by surprise. Initially, after the discovery of the line, she ignored it but a week later the infection grew angry and red. So, she went to see her doctor in Chicago. She was then referred to a dermatologist and a biopsy was done. They found out that it was a melanoma.

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"We kind of both just brushed it off, and thought it was a bruise," she said. "A few days later, my finger swelled up really bad and I automatically thought I got some sort of infection from the nail salon." The bruise they found looked like a straight thin line drawn with a sharpie and had “a purplish tint” to it, Jasko recalled. When her infection had grown, it wasn't the infection itself but the purple line that had freaked her. Dr. Vishal Patel, assistant professor of dermatology at the George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences in Washington, D.C., told TODAY, that the UV light is like "tanning beds for your hands.” Dr. Patel, who is also the director of the cutaneous oncology program at the GW Cancer Center, said, "We’re seeing a lot of patients having not only melanomas but all types of skin cancers around the fingertips and the cuticles.”

Disclaimer : This article is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.